Top


Forum


Be Sociable, Share!

Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Login form protected by Login LockDown.


Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

 
 

— Match —

 
 
 

— Forum Options —

 
 
 

Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
water pans
June 15, 2010
7:48 am
2hands4u
Virginia Beach
Rookie
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
June 15, 2010
Offline

I have my first smoker (Char-Griller Duo with SFB). I want to try ribs low and slow. Char-Griller mentions using and pan of water in the Side Fire Box. I've read in some other places to have the water pan right under the food(ribs) in the cooking compartment. Is having a pan of water in the SFB AND under the food too much? Any comments and/or recommendations are appreciated.

Be Sociable, Share!
June 28, 2010
10:16 pm
homebbq
Admin
Forum Posts: 125
Member Since:
June 24, 2008
Offline

Hello

Thank you for stopping in..  There is an article somewhere on this site, that explains what the water pan is for, and what I think of them. And, a video, that explains replacing the water with sand…

A water pan's purpose in a smoker is to help keep the temp controlled, and they would usually reside above the fire, and in the smokers that use them for the most part, that is also underneath the meat. The smoker you have does not need a water pan, to keep the temp controlled.  It possibly may help in keeping the temp regulated, but I really don't think you need it.

I hope this helps

Kevin
HomeBBQ.com

Be Sociable, Share!
June 29, 2010
11:45 am
2hands4u
Virginia Beach
Rookie
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
June 15, 2010
Offline

Thank you Kevin

I found the article you referred to under 'articles' then 'bbq essentials'. I did my first smoke on father's day weekend (two Boston Butts). It took a full 10 hours to get the internal temps to 180. I will be posting my experience…problems encountered, lessons learned and minor mods that I'm trying with my cooker soon.

Be Sociable, Share!
July 2, 2010
12:55 pm
homebbq
Admin
Forum Posts: 125
Member Since:
June 24, 2008
Offline

Did you use the water pan?

Also, how large was the butt? and what temp were you trying to cook at?

Kevin
HomeBBQ.com

Be Sociable, Share!
July 2, 2010
7:00 pm
2hands4u
Virginia Beach
Rookie
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
June 15, 2010
Offline

I did use a water pan in the side fire box above the coals. One of the butts was 6lbs the other 7lbs. I was trying to keep the temp as close to 250F as possible. I was quite successful at 240-250 for the first 4 hours before the temp started falling off. I soon found out that ash was choking the coals. The temp fell to about 200F before I pulled the ash/coal tray out of the SFB and scooped out the ash build-up. I replaced the ash/coal tray and put fresh lit coals in and got the temp back to 250-260F. At the end of the next 4 hours I should have done the same thing but I didn't. I kept putting fresh coals in and fan it to get the temp up. The ash was choking the fire out again. I fought it for two more hours by fanning the fire until I reached an internal temp of 180F in the 7lbs butt. I thought the butts turned out great. Next time I need to manage the fire better and be ready to clean-out the ash every 4 hours. I was using Kingsford briquets. Next time I'll try a hardwood lump charcoal.

Be Sociable, Share!
July 12, 2010
5:11 pm
homebbq
Admin
Forum Posts: 125
Member Since:
June 24, 2008
Offline

Sorry this is delayed. Kingsford will give you alot of ash, using lump will help this tremendously, but you wull need to add charcoal more frequently. Are you using a grate to put charcoal on, and if so is there a 3 to 4 inch gap underneath it?

Kevin

HomeBBQ.com

Be Sociable, Share!
July 13, 2010
7:57 am
2hands4u
Virginia Beach
Rookie
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
June 15, 2010
Offline

During that first attempt I did use a grate to put the charcoal on but it only had a clearance of 1 1/8". Since then I have made an expanded metal box (4" x 10" x 14") and removed the grate. I now have a clearance of 2" underneath. I have not tried another low and slow indirect cook since my first attempt. The SFB is small and I'm not sure how get a clearance of 3-4" and still be able to replenish the charcoal. If I raise the charcoal box up to give a 3" clearance I won't be able to slide the tray out.

I need to try another long cook to see if the basket I made works any better. If I make another basket 12" x 12" x 6" I can get between 3 and 4" but I'll have to remove the upper grates in the SFB. I had used those upper grates to hold the pan of water and my smoke chip box.

Be Sociable, Share!
July 13, 2010
9:21 am
homebbq
Admin
Forum Posts: 125
Member Since:
June 24, 2008
Offline

2 inches is fine, although if your using a charcoal like kingsford, or some other similar briquet, it will fill up with ash fairly quickly. If you can find a hardwood briquet, that will be best. It will be more ash than lump charcoal, but not as much as Kingsford, and it will burn longer than regular lump charcoal.

Kevin

HomeBBQ.com

Be Sociable, Share!
Forum Timezone: UTC -4

Most Users Ever Online: 81

Currently Online:
4 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

beltwaybbq: 53

TomTheGrillGuy: 12

CarbonThief: 11

kick201: 10

hosstd: 9

MeatEater77: 8

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 310

Moderators: 4

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 4

Forums: 11

Topics: 152

Posts: 404

Newest Members:

Moderators: Big Dan (13), KAPN (19), The BBQ Guy (7), gregrempe (2)

Administrators: admin (18), homebbq (125)

Be Sociable, Share!

Bottom