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How much smoke for brisket?
February 18, 2009
8:23 am
Duckhead79
Newport News, Va
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February 18, 2009
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Hello ya'll. I'm new to the forum, but not new to bbq. I have been doing it for a few years now, and can do pork butts real nice, and my friends believe my brisket is delicious. I neer have a problem filling the seats around the table, and usually a second table, when I announce I will be smoking a brisket.

I do have one concern…. I personally think my brisket comes out with a little too much smoke flavor (compared to resteraunt bought), and some of my friends agree, although they still love it.

I have varied my smoking times and the amount of smoke ( by smoke I mean wood chips…hickory, mesquite, pecan…) I put in at one time, but it still seems heavy.

Is there a guideline or something to better regulate this? Lets say I use chunk wood, about the size of a baseball or smaller. How many of these should I use at one time? How many over the course of the few hours the meat is in the smoker?

Is it better to use small amounts of smoke over the entire cooking process? or to use a lot of smoke in the beginning for the first hour or so then stop after an hour and a half or so and just continue cooking with no smoke….?

Thank ya'll for the help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11

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How about ya'll come sit on my deck while I smoke some meat! (my wife hates when I say that haha)
February 19, 2009
3:21 am
homebbq
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June 24, 2008
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Hey Duckhead

Thx for stopping by…

There is not any real guideline to follow, there are way to many variables for that, the biggest being personal taste. You will get several different varying opinions, and here is mine… Smoke should be treated like any other flavor, spice, or seasoning, the amount of wood you use is really based on the cooker you use, and the method… If your getting comments of it being to much smoke, cut what your doing in half, and see if that is where you need to be, you can always go down or up from there..

I hope this helped

Kevin
HomeBBQ.com

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February 19, 2009
6:25 am
beltwaybbq
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July 10, 2008
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Duck -

No matter what meat you have on your cooker, the smoke you choose will permeate that meat fairly quickly.  If you are smoking for the entire cook or even more than 50% of your cook time, it's too much.  You'll get the smoke flavor you want and the smoke ring we all strive for by using smoke 25% of your entire cook.

That's my take.

Good luck!

beltwaybbq

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February 19, 2009
11:12 am
Duckhead79
Newport News, Va
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February 18, 2009
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Thanks for the input guys. I'll give it all a shot. I swear everytime I smoke my brisket, I cut down on the amount of amoke I use, but it still seems to be too much.

We'll see.

Chris

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How about ya'll come sit on my deck while I smoke some meat! (my wife hates when I say that haha)
April 8, 2010
9:02 pm
Chris33
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April 8, 2010
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Always have had trouble with Hickory and mesquite. Way to pungent for my taste and my friends. I also have limited the amount of wood I use also but still havent gone back to the hickory. I mainly use cherry and apple with some oak and never have problems with the smoke being too strong. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Chris

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April 13, 2010
9:45 pm
Tim_Abrahamson
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April 13, 2010
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After 3 hours a brisket will have taken all the smoke it can take. Adding more smoking agent after that point will only turn the bark bitter.   When I smoke brisket I usually use a couple of chunks of oak and a little bit of hickory several times over the first several hours of cooking, after that I just use coals.  That usuallly provides enough smoke for my needs. 

Also, just because you cant see the smoke doesnt mean its not smoking.  If you see a lot of smoke you are putting ash and creasoat onto your meat.  As smoke goes, you should barely see it.  Clean smoke gives a better, less heavy smoke flavor. 

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