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Is My Barbecue Ready Yet? – Cooking Pork

June 16, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

porkTo many in Southeast US, the very meaning of barbecue, is pork. Pork is obviously a very generic term, and really could mean anything cooked from a hog. However for most of us, in barbecue, cooking pork means the shoulder, and for most, the desired cut from the shoulder is the Boston Butt, and this is what we will cover in this article.

The selection process I use for this piece of meat, includes finding one has the fat well marbled or dispersed throughout the cut.

Then, I start looking at weight, the higher the weight, the longer the cook, so I like them right in the middle (8-9lbs). You can find very small ones, which in my opinion are normally difficult to get tender (4-6lb), and the very large ones (11-13lb) are difficult to cook evenly.

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SMOKING THE SHOULDER

July 5, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

 
Pork shoulder is really two cuts of meat, the butt portion or “boston butt” and the picnic. Typically the shoulder is used for pulled pork, and rightfully so, if cooked properly this meat will practically pull itself. If you have heard the term “low and slow” it definately applies here. This cut of meat loves time. Ok, lets get started!
Smoking The Shoulder
 
Description: Pork shoulder is really two cuts of meat, the butt portion or “boston butt” and the picnic.Typically the shoulder is used for pulled pork, and rightfully so, if cooked properly this meat will practically pull itself.

If you have heard the term “low and slow” it definately applies here. This cut of meat loves time.

Ok, lets get started!

If I buy a shoulder, I will try to get them to take as much of the skin off as possible, without removing the fat cap.

Its very difficult to use a rub when there is alot of skin.

I like to use my Florida Rub (listed under rub recipe’s). It does a great job on this cut of meat.

1. Thouroughly coat the shoulder with yellow mustard.
2. Liberally cover the meat on all sides with the rub.
3. Let marinate over night covered and refridgerated.
4. I usually soak my hickory chunks over night as well.
5. Bring the smoker up to a temperature between 200 – 225 degrees.
6. Place shoulder on V-Rack in drip pan (BGE), or directly on the rack in water smokers and offsets, and place it in the smoker (make sure you add your wood chunks to the fire).
7. Smoke the shoulder for about 75 to 90 minutes per pound, depending on what temperature you are cooking at, type of pit, and the physical size of the piece of meat
8. About half way through the cook, remove the shoulder from the smoker and wrap in heavy aluminum foil.
9. Either place it back into the smoker, or in the oven at 225 degrees.
10. Let cook wrapped until the internal temp reaches 194 to 200.
11. When finished, let stand wrapped for about 10 to 20 minutes, and then start pulling it apart.
12. Now its time to add a finishing sauce, I like to use the Vaunted Vinegar sauce (from Smoke and Spice), or STUBB’s spicy.
13. Place back into the oven at 200 degrees covered for 30 to 60 minutes.
14. Remove from the oven and serve

This should make you a hit at any party.

Cooking times will vary based on the type of smoker you are using. Make sure to read the manual.

The Renowned Mr Brown

June 20, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

Leonard Heuberger

In old Southern Slang, Mr Brown is the dark, smoky outside part of the barbequed pork, usually the shoulder. This is the traditional cooking style, perfected by generations of pitmasters to give Mr. Brown his deserved renown.

Southern Succor Rub
1/4 cup ground black pepper
1/4 cup paprika
1/4 cup turbinado sugar
2 tablespoons salt
2 teaspoons dry mustard
1 teaspoon cayenne

6 pound to 8 pound Boston butt

Southern Sop (optional)
Remaining Southern Succor Rub
2 cups cider vinegar
1 cup water
3 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon paprika
1 tablespoon cayenne

Serves 8 to 10

The night before you plan to barbecue, combine the rub ingredients in a small bowl. Massage the pork well with about half of the rub. Transfer the pork to a plastic bag and refrigerate overnight.

Before you begin to barbecue, remove the pork from the refridgerator. Pat down the butt with another coating of rub. Let the pork sit at room temperature for about 45 minutes.

Prepare the smoker for barbecuing, bringing the temperature to 200 degrees F to 220 degrees F.

If you plan to baste the pork, stir any remaining rub together with the mop ingredients in a saucepan and warm the mixture over low heat.

Transfer the pork to the smoker and cook it for about 1 1/2 hours per pound, or internal temperature reaches 170 degrees to 180 degrees.Mop the pork about once an hour in wood-burning pit, or as appropriate for your style smoker.

remove the pork from the smoker and let it sit for about 15 minutes, until cool enough to handle.Pull of chunks of the meat, and either shred or chop them as you wish. Make sure each serving has some of the darker chewier Mr. Brown along with the lighter interior meat. If you wish, serve the pork with Golden Mustard Barbeque Sauce, Carolina Red, or Vaunted Vinegar Sauce.

All BBQ Needs Is A Good Rub!

June 18, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

herbs-spices

By Kevin Bevington

As the masses begin to uncover their bbq grills and smokers for the season of barbecue and Grilling, many wonder what will set theirs apart from the rest. The answer? A good rub can make a world of difference. Sure, a good barbecue sauce is still a good thing to have to compliment your meal, but the seasoning is the key.

A bbq rub, is commonly referred to as a dry marinade, many times, it can actually bring more flavor to your barbecue than a liquid marinade, especially when used in a similar fashion.
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