Top

HomeBBQ.com is in the Jack!

September 3, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

Jack Daniels Invitational

With only 2 draws in this years drawing HomeBBQ.com was drawn to represent Florida in this years Jack Daniels Invitational World Championship.

Here is the Official Listing from the KCBS Website;

OFFICIAL Jack Daniel’s Draw Winners
September 3, 2009

21st Annual
Jack Daniel’s World Championship
Invitational Barbecue
“The Draw”

AUTOMATICS:
4 Legs UP BBQ, Great Bend, KS, 2008 Jack Daniel’s
Four Men and A Pig, Olathe, KS, 2008 American Royal Open
Blazen BBQ, Hillsboro, TX, HLS&R Barbecue
Sweet Swine O’Mine, Olive Branch, MS, Memphis in May

Pellet Envy, Leawood, KS, Seven + Wins
Bub-Ba-Q, Canton, GA, Seven Wins
Munchin Hog’s @ the Hilton, Prairie Village, KS, Seven Wins
Rhythm ‘n QUE, Phoenix, AZ, Seven Wins
Swamp Boys, Winter Haven, FL, Seven Wins

Boss Hogg Barbecue, Fairbanks, AK, AK State Winner
cancersuckschicago.com, Westmont, IL, AZ State Winner
R2 – BQ, Wantagh, NY, CT State Winner
PA Midnite Smoker, Willow Street, PA, DE State Winner
Cool Smoke, Richmond, VA, DC Winner
“Team Ida Q”, Boise, ID, ID State Winner
I Smell Smoke, Malden, MA, MA/VT State Winner
3 Eyz BBQ, Owings Hills, MD, MD State Winner
I Que, Hopkinton, MA, ME State Winner
Blake’s BBQ, Gilbert, AZ, NV State Winner
Lakeside Smokers, Methuen, MA, NH State Winner
Parrothead Smokers, Dakota Dunes, SD, PA State Winner
Spitfire, Fargo, ND, SD State Winner
Hoochie – Que, Park City, UT, UT State Winner
Just Smokin’ Around, Frederick, MD, WV State Winner
Burnin Bobs Butts n Bones, Morrison, CO, WY
State Winner

CONTEST STATE TEAM NAME HM STATE
AL Wild Bunch Butt Burners, AL
AR Tee Wayne’s Smoking Lipps, LA
CA All Hogs go to Heaven, CA
CO Wild Hogs BBQ, CO
FL HomeBBQ.com, FL
GA Jack’s Old South, GA
IA Iowa’s Smokey D’s BBQ, IA
IL Ulcer Acres BBQ, IL
IN Shigs In Pit, IN
KS Rubbin It & Lovin It BBQ, KS
KY Monty Pigthon & the Holy Grill, KY
LA QUAU, IL
MI Extreme Roasters, MI
MN The Heat Is On, MN
MO The Pickled Pig, KS
MS Big Boyz Cookin’ Crew, MS
NC Checkered Pig, VA
NE To The Bee BBQ, NE
NJ Lo’ -N- Slo’ BBQ, NJ
NM Naaman’s BBQ, AR
NY lunchmeat, MA
OH Hoosier Crawdaddy, IN
OK STU’S Q BBQ, OK
OR Fat Dad’s Barbeque, OR
SC Chatham Artillery BBQ, GA
TN Music City Pig Pals, TN
TX Redneck Cookers, TX
VA Dizzy Pig , VA
WA Smoke A Fat One BBQ, WA
WI Dr. Porkenstein, WI

Chicken Grillables from Barber Foods

July 4, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

ChickenGrillablesClara and I started a diet, and of course a diet is an absolute curse to someone that enjoys cooking, and eating as much as I do.

The folks at Barber Foods ironically sent me a brand new product to try, they call them Chicken Grillables. This is a bun size 4 oz patty of breast meat, that can easily substitute for a hamburger, for those times you would just prefer to have chicken.

At only 140 calories and 5 grams of fat this is a perfect choice for those watching what they are eating. They come pre-seasoned online casino poker gambling, so online casino sportsbooks all you have to do is pull from the package and cook. I have to say, as easy as these are, good tasting, this is definately staying on the menu during our diet.

For those that may not recognize the Barber Foods name, they are the ones who sell the stuffed chicken breasts, in the frozen foods section of your grocery store.

If you want something convenient for the bun, or on its own for those watching their carbs, this is a vey good choice. Look for Chicken Grillables in the frozen food section of your grocery store.

From The Cooking Class – Happy July 4th!

July 4, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

creamerHappy July 4th everyone!

We know you will be cooking out today, and wanted to throw in a very nice, easy, potato recipe. We have made several variations of this in our cooking class, and today we will give you the works.

There are 2 very important ingredients, first the potatoes. It’s very important to choose a creamer variety, either a gold (Yukon Gold), or Red (Creamer Red) variety of potatoes. Why? the creamer potato is harvested young, and yields a very tender, moisture rich, almost buttery flavor and texture. The second very important ingredient is the onions. The best onion for this recipe is the sweet onion, preferably the Vidalia. Why? The Vidalia is grown in a specific region in Georgia, and in my opinion, even though there are look alikes, the Vidalia is king.

Cheesy Grilled Potatoes
6 to 8 Potatoes (Yukon Gold preferably) (Sliced)
2 – sweet Onions (Chopped)
1 – Bell Peppers (chopped)
1 -stick butter
6 to 8 slices – pre-cooked bacon
2 cups – Shredded cheddar cheese (or Jack and Colby combo)
Garlic Lovers Seasoning (or you can use Salt, Pepper, Granulated Garlic)
Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Combine sliced potatoes, chopped onions, and chopped bell peppers in aluminum foil.
Break bacon into pieces and combine with potatoes.
Drizzle olive oil over potatoes liberally
Place slices of butter evenly across top of mixture
Season liberally with HomeBBQ.com Garlic Lovers Seasoning cook over low heat for 25 to 30 minutes (or until potatoes are soft).
Immediately after Removing from grill, top with shredded cheese, and serve.
Enjoy!

Happy July 4th!

A DIY Digital Meat Thermometer with Predictive Filter?

June 15, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

systemontable_t We have certainly seen high tech in BBQ the last few years.

With the Digi-Q II, the FEC 100, the Therma-pen, and the list goes on and on. Well, I received this email today from Humberto Evans with nerdkits.com regarding a DIY project that is near and dear to all of our hearts.. A DIY Meat Thermometer with Predictive Filter! uh… ok!  I get it, I think.

Humberto Evans and his partner Mike Robbins, both MIT Grads create a video and web page that tells you how to do it. I will let Humberto’s own words explain this for you, and be sure to check out the web page at http://www.nerdkits.com/videos/meat_thermometer/

From Humberto Evans:
Even though cooking is an elegant art form, the at-home chef often has a number of fancy gadgets. From counter top grills to USB coolers, high end electronics have made themselves available in most aspects of modern food preparation and enjoyment. In keeping with our DIY spirit, and with Father’s Day and July 4th grilling right around the corner, we decided to build a DIY Digital Meat Thermometer using a temperature sensor, an LCD, and a microcontroller. To our delight, getting this project to work well required some interesting bits of engineering including advanced signal processing.

In this video tutorial, we outline the process for building the DIY Digital Meat Thermometer. In order to speed up the measured reading, we estimate what the transfer function of the system is and use a predictive filter to “guess” what the actual temperature is at the tip of our probe. The concepts, and the some of the intuition behind it, are presented in our video tutorial. The meat thermometer can be used with a computer to give a live temperature graph, or be used with just the LCD. Whether it’s a fathers day gift, or just a fun weekend project, this little gadget is sure to draw some attention at the next family cookout.”

From the Cooking Class

June 13, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

As many of you know, almost every Wednesday night, we have been doing backyard BBQ and Grilling classes at All Grills and More in Oviedo, FL. In the classes Clara and I focus on doing recipes that can be easily reproduced for friends and family in their own backyard.

This has been a big hit, and I want to thank all who have participated, we continue to make new friends through this, and personally I love to hear how they made of the recipes from the class at a party they were giving and how much of a hit it was. It definately makes it all worthwhile.

A recipe that has been around for awhile in a few different variations, and has been a big hit in my rib class, is this Apple Baked Beans recipe. Not only does it have a very unique flavor, it is very much a conversation piece while we are making them. And now, I am going to share my variation of this recipe with you.

We start with pre-made baked beans, and my favorite for this is Busch’s Original Baked Beans. Here is the recipe;

Apple Baked Beans

4 (16 oz) cans Bush’s Original Baked Beans
4 slices (cooked) bacon, diced
3/4 cup HomeBBQ.com Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce (or your favorite bbq sauce)
1 lb crumbled cooked Jimmy Dean Maple pork sausage
1 (21oz) can Comstock Apple Pie Filling (break up large pieces of apples)
1 Large sweet onion (Vidalia preferred), finely diced
1 green pepper, finely diced
3/4 cup brown sugar (dark preferrably)
2 1/2 Tblsp. Lee & Perrins Worcestershire sauce
2 1/2 Tblsp. Yellow or Brown Mustard
1 tblsp. Hot Sauce (I prefer Texas Petes or Loiusiana Hot Sauce)
2 tblsp. HomeBBQ.com Rib Rub (or your favorite BBQ Rub)
1 tsp Cayenne Pepper

The easy way to do this, is to combine all ingredients and cook on the grill or smoker 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
The second method would be to saute the onions and green peppers, then add them and cook until hot.

Enjoy!

HomeBBQ.com Backyard BBQ and Grilling Classes Start Tonight!

January 14, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

All About Grills - Oviedo, FL Oviedo, FL – 5 Time FBA Team of the Year Champion, and the 2008 FBA Triple Crown Champion, Kevin Bevington, of HomeBBQ.com begins his first in a series of Backyard Barbecue and Grilling classes at All About Grills in Oviedo, FL, tonight at 6:30pm.

The first class will be “Basics on the Grill”, in this class he will cover easy to prepare dishes on the grill, including a side dishes and desert.

Every wednesday will be a class which includes recipes from the DVD’s from HomeBBQ.com, “Grilling with HomeBBQ.com” and “Backyard Barbecue with HomeBBQ.com”. Class details are below;

January 14th 6:30 pm       Basics on the grill

January 21st    6:30 pm     Classic Steak House

January 28th   6:30 pm     Beef on the Grill

February 4th    6:30 pm     Seafood on the Grill

February 18th    6:30 pm   All About Ribs

February 25th    6:30 pm  Barbeque Beef

March 4th    6:30 pm – Seafood

March 11th    6:30 pm – All About Pork

March 18th    6:30 pm – All About Chicken

Early Bird Registration – $45 per person, or $75 per couple

For more Information, Contact All About Grills at the contact info below;

 

All About Grills Oviedo
71 Geneva Drive
Oviedo, FL 32765
407-366-7301
 

Real Wood Smoke Flavor from a gas grill

August 18, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

I am one of the guys who loves my gas grill, and I really do not care what others say.

I like the ease of use, predicable performance, easy of cleaning, and all of that.  But, it took me awhile to learn how to get “real wood smoke flavor” from my gasser.

 When using my smoker, I have learned to love certain smoke flavors with certain types of meat. For example, I like fruit woods such as Cherry, Apple, and Peach on poultry and pork. For beef (primarily Brisket Burgers on the gasser), I like a touch of Mesquite.

I have also played with specialty chips such as the Jack Daniels barrel chips and such with mixed results. To get the smoke flavor, I use a “Smoke Bomb” loaded with chips or pellets of the desired flavor.

A Smoke Bomb is basically a closed container with only a couple of air holes to allow smoke to escape.

A Smoke Bomb can be made that lasts a long time, even to an hour or more if needed. It works so well because it restricts the oxygen to the chips or pellets, producing a longer and smoldering burn that reduces flare ups and quick burning.

 I started with the most simple of Smoke Bombs, just heavy duty aluminum foil. I made a double layer big enough to resemble a small grapefruit with chips or pellets inside. Sealed it up good and poked one or two tiny holes in the top with a tooth pick or my trusty Thermopen. Place it on a burner and when smoke starts emitting from the holes, it is time to cook.

 The next step up for me was one of those stamped and bent sheet metal boxes sold by Home Depot with “smoking chips” in them Viagra 100mg. They Viagra Online are about 5-6 inches long, 3 inches wide, and an inch deep. The first thing is to throw away the “smoking chips” unless you really know what they are. If you try to use these open boxes with chips, you will need to soak them first or they will just ignite and last a minute or two. Not even long enough to do a smoked hot dog. So, I wrapped the box with good ole HD aluminum foil and poked a couple of small holes in the top to restrict combustion air. Worked like a charm. Biggest benefit was that the box gave some form to the Smoke Bomb when compared to HD foil only. Worked well.

My final evolutionary step was a cast iron skillet to hold the chips and pellets. I found an old 7 Inch skillet at a garage sale for $2. I cover it with HD foil with a couple of teeny -tiny holes again. One quarter to one half a cup of pellets or chips produces plenty of smoke for a good steak cook. Because of it’s mass, I put the skillet on my side burner to get the heat up and start the smoke. Then, the skillet fits perfectly on the two left hand burners on my five burner gas grill.

I defy anyone to tell that my steak cooked with a Mesquite Smoke Bomb came off a gasser! Outstanding wood smoke flavor, and that is what BBQ is all about.

Chips a pellets are available at many places, including WalMart if you watch the BBQ area closely. Small quantities of pellets are available on-line in many flavors. I tequires so few pellets or chips per cook that they are really cost effective when used only for flavor.

Happy Cooking.

TIM

What Appeared to be Becoming Fiction, is Now Reality

August 2, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

For over a year I have been talking about it, and almost 9 month’s ago, they were filmed, and now they are a reality. As of today, Grilling With HomeBBQ.com and Backyard dvdsBBQ with HomeBBQ.com are officially available for sale, and shipment.

At the begining of January, I sent out a notice to all of my loyal customers letting them know they could purchase the DVD’s, pre-release at a substancial discount. Many purchased them, the unfortunate thing was, they were not ready until now. I deeply apologize to those who have been waiting patiently for these, this is something I am brand new to, and had no idea what obstacles I  was about to face. I have lots of boxes outside my front door right now waiting for USPS to pick up, and they are finally on their way to you.

The DVDs are initially being made available through CreateSpace.com’s on Demand program, and are now also available through Amazon.com, the product ASIN’s at Amazon are as follows;
Grilling With HomeBBQ.com – B001DKY3H2
Backyard Barbecue with HomeBBQ.com – B001DL1DKG

You can purchase them directly through CreateSpace.com here;
Grilling with HomeBBQ.com – http://www.createspace.com/252519
Backyard BBQ with HomeBBQ.com – http://www.createspace.com/252518

In about 3 to 4 weeks, they will also be available through Amazon’s Unbox. This is an exiting time for us, and hope you thouroughly enjoy these DVDs.

HomeBBQ.com releases 2 New DVD’s

August 2, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

HomeBBQ.com releases Barbecue and Grilling DVDs

HomeBBQ.com has released 2 DVD’s for the backyard cook. “Grilling with HomeBBQ.com” and “Backyard BBQ with HomeBBQ.com”.

In “Grilling with HomeBBQ.com”, Kevin Bevington (5 time FBA Team of the Year Champion) demonstrates cooking on gas and charcoal grills. He starts with the basics and then goes into some great food, including full recipes, and preparation. This DVD will include; Hamburgers, Steak, Chicken, Tri-Tip Roast, Pork Chops, Grilled Salmon, Shrimp, Stuffed Flank Steak, Baltimore Pit Beef, Pork Loin, and much more..

In “Backyard BBQ with HomeBBQ.com” Kevin Bevington (5 time FBA Team of the Year Champion) demonstrates cooking low and slow on a small offset cooker  and a bullet style water pan smoker. He starts with the basics on how to start your cookers, maintaining even temp, goes through full meat prep, and the process of cooking and finishing these meats. This DVD includes full recipes, and preparation. Included are the following; Boston Butt (pulled pork), Beef Brisket, St Louis Style Ribs, Baby Back Ribs, Country Style Ribs, Standing Rib Roast, Turkey, and much more.

These DVD’s can be purchased now via CreateSpace.com through the links below.

Grilling with HomeBBQ.com – http://www.createspace.com/252519

Backyard BBQ with HomeBBQ.com – http://www.createspace.com/252518

We will make these available as packages on HomeBBQ.com online store soon.

Barbeque Fuels

July 25, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

charcoalMy name is Dan Colmerauer – aka “Big Dan.” You may know me from my booklet on how to modify a “backyard” offset smoker to make it perform better. The majority of my articles will deal with what goes into building proper fire in your smoker and related topics – but I will diverge from that from time to time. By the way, I will accept questions and comments via e-mail at: screenwriter2@earthlink.net or 2bigdan2@earthlink.net – I try to reply to any and all e-mails but I do not use my computer on weekends and sometimes it may take a day or two before I have time to reply so please be patient.

I am a backyard cooker only — I don’t do catering or cook-offs, etc. I have, however, been barbequing in one form or another for almost 35 years. Originally from Buffalo, New York I was often seen barbequing and grilling even in middle of the biggest snow storms. I now live in Phoenix, Arizona where some days in the summer I swear all you need to do is put the meat in your smoker and wheel the smoker out into the sun. I have a Hondo offset smoker, a Weber Smoky Mountain, a Weber “kettle” grill, and a barrel smoker and I use them all.

Knowing how to build and maintain a fire is the most important part of barbequing. You can have the greatest recipe in the world – buy the best quality meat you can find – yet if you can’t build and maintain a long, steady fire, your final product will suffer.

Today, I’d like to discuss fuel. There are three basic fuels for barbeque: wood, lump charcoal and briquettes.

Typical briquettes are made from powdered charcoal mixed with binders and fillers such as coal dust. Their biggest advantage is an easily controlled, steady fire with very little temperature fluctuation. Their biggest drawback is the large volume of ash produced when burning briquettes. In an offset style smoker the ash will actually build up and snuff out your fire in about 4 hours – not enough time to barbeque much of anything. Plus, there are too many additives that can alter the flavor of the final product for my taste. But, they are inexpensive, readily available, easy to use and certainly can turn out a fairly decent final product.

There are briquettes available (but very hard to find) that are made out of 100% hardwood charcoal and all natural binders. No additives – no strange fillers – just pure 100% hardwood charcoal. I have used Rancher 100% hardwood briquettes and Royal Oak 100% hardwood briquettes and was pleasantly surprised – both at the flavor and the performance. While producing much more ash than lump charcoal, I was still able to maintain a steady 220 for over six hours. And the flavor was a huge improvement over regular briquettes. In an upright “water smoker” such at the Weber Smoky Mountain these are probably the best fuel you can use. I ran mine for over 22 hours with the Rancher briquettes without refueling and still had briquettes left in the smoker to burn. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to find either Rancher or Royal Oak 100% hardwood briquettes in over a year.

Natural lump charcoal (sometimes called www jesextender JesExtender “charwood”) is my fuel of choice. Lump charcoal is made by burning hardwood in the absence of oxygen. The process burns off all the impurities (creosote, etc.) leaving a final product that is free of all the bad stuff that can ruin the flavor of the meat. It burns hotter than briquettes and a quality lump charcoal will leave very little ash – which means you will achieve a long, steady burning fire which will impart a wonderful “woodsy” flavor to the meat with a nice touch of smoke. There are a large number of brands of lump available – some not much better than briquettes and others darned near the “holy grail” of barbeque fuel. Hopefully, you will have a good brand available in your area.

The ability to use wood as a fuel is seen by many as the hallmark of the true pitmaster. I don’t necessarily agree.

The single most important factor in whether you can successfully use only wood as your fuel source is your smoker. The typical backyard smoker is simply too small to use wood as fuel unless you burn it down to coals first. In fact, many commercial pitmasters (especially in the barbeque belt) will burn the wood down to coals first no matter what type of smoker they have. The reason for this is simple – you want to burn off the impurities before exposing the meat to the smoke.

So — I tried this once. I used over $50 worth of wood – spent six straight hours burning wood and shoveling coals and the ribs came out tasting exactly like they did with lump charcoal. Some Internet research revealed what has since become my mantra: a glowing lump of hardwood charcoal is IDENTICAL to a glowing coal/ember burned down from logs. The only difference is how it got there.

Interestingly enough – at the more recent bbq cook-offs I’ve attended (I do love to eat good ‘que) I’ve noticed that most of the competitors were using lump charcoal in even the biggest of smokers because —- a glowing lump of hardwood charcoal is IDENTICAL to a glowing coal/ember burned down from logs.

Now, what about wood chunks or chips for added smoke flavor. They work, but you have to be very careful because there is a very fine line between a little extra smoke flavor and over-smoked, creosote-coated meat. Cross that line and you’ve ruined a nice hunk of meat (unless, of course, you like the flavor of creosote). This is more of a problem in the offset smokers than with the uprights. The man in Phoenix who sells cooking wood to all the local restaurants taught me a neat trick if you like to use chunks or chips for a stronger smoke flavor. Simply take a piece of heavy duty foil and gently place it on top of the meat – don’t “tent” it and don’t “wrap” it – just gently lay it on top. The foil will catch most of the bad stuff before it settles on the meat leaving the meat exposed to the remaining flavorful part of the smoke.

Next time I’ll discuss exactly how to build a fire using the Minion method for a long, steady fire.

For now….

Keep on cookin’!

Big Dan

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bottom