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BBQ Tips

June 29, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

If you’re a new barbecue cook or new to bbq contests, here are a few BBQ tips to shorten your learning curve. When I was starting these tips were shared with me and I share them with new cooks every chance I get.

How to keep BBQ hot if you’re not quite ready to eat it…use an ice chest/ice cooler. Put some hot water in an empty ice chest, close the lid and let it set for 3 or 4 minutes. Drain the hot water and you’ve got yourself a portable BBQ warmer. We’ve kept pork butts warm this way for 6 or 7 hours.

How to keep your hands clean when cooking BBQ…use powder free latex gloves. They come in packs of 100 at the local Sam’s Club and will keep your hands clean. You’ll maintain good sanitary practices too. Many bbq sanctioning bodies require the use of gloves when preparing contest entries.

How to keep your spouse interested in the BBQ hobby…get him/her involved in it with you. It’s a lot of fun. You meet nice people and it’s something you can do together.

How to keep your BBQ expenses in line with your budget…research all your purchases thoroughly. Make sure your purchase will do what you want it to do BEFORE you purchase it. For example, if you want to learn to cook whole hogs, you probably need to consider a big cooker or if you want to cook 10-15 racks spare ribs every weekend you’re going to need something bigger than a WSM.

How to continually improve your BBQ recipes…keep records of your cooking efforts including cook times, prepping techniques used and especially measurements for sauces or rubs and spices used. When you tweak the recipe for taste, only change one thing at a time–change the cook time, change the rub, change the sauce, but try to avoid completely changing everything all at once. Small changes to your technique and recipes will help you focus on the effects better and you’ll be able to fine tune the product quality more efficiently.

CG-15 Commercial Grade Vacuum Sealer

June 27, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

CG-15 Vacuum SealerA couple of years ago, I purchased a commercial grade vacuum sealer from Cabela’s.

My wife and I were looking for a solution for storing leftover bbq. I often cook multiple pork butts and multiple briskets, which is a lot of meat for two people. We love the vacuum sealer. Leftover bbq will store for a few days in standard plastic bowls with lids, but more than a few days of storage requires something more substantial. Enter the vacuum sealer solution.

The vacuum sealer extends the storage life of food by withdrawing oxygen that accelerates the deterioriation and hastens the spoilage process in food. After cooking, we just place the remaining meat into a bag of the appropriate size, press a button and a few seconds later we have a professional quality vacuum seal that will store in the freezer or refrigerator with ease.

When we have a craving for bbq, we just pop the bag into a pan of hot water and–presto–we have a bbq meal at our fingertips.

I’ll be the first to warn prospective vacuum sealer shoppers that the CG-15 Commercial Grade Vacuum Sealer is not inexpensive. Ours cost $399.99 and the 15 x 18 size bags were another $45.00, but when you bbq as much as we do…and can’t eat all that you cook in one setting (we often cook 10-15 lbs. of meat at a time), the vacuum sealer is a wise investment.

For the cost conscious bbq cook, Foodsaver makes a more economical line of vacuum sealers that retail for prices in the $100 range. The Foodsaver bags are less expensive as well. I’ve not used a Foodsaver, so I can’t vouch for their effectiveness as compared to the Cabela’s model.

Is My Barbecue Ready Yet? – Cooking Ribs

June 26, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

ribsBy Kevin Bevington

There are different ways to cook, and determine doneness in your BBQ ribs, and we are going to break those down into the 2 types.

St Louis Spare Ribs – St Louis Spare Ribs can be one of the most difficult meats to cook and to get done accurately. Many of the ways you would determine doneness, take some time and experience to identify and master. But first, we will cover a good process to use, which will take you real close to being done, and then you can apply a couple of simple techniques to determine doneness.

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Is My Barbecue Ready Yet? – Part 2

June 22, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

smallfire

By Kevin Bevington

Ok, we made our rub. Now that we have our barbecue tasting good, we want to make sure we are cooking it properly. BBQ that is cooked properly will actually stand out better than BBQ that may actually have better tasting seasoning and sauce. This is where a lot of new barbecue competition teams miss the boat, and especially those in the backyard trying to cook bbq for their friends and family.

Let’s start with the tools you will need to bring you closer to your tender barbecue goal. First, let’s talk about your cooker, or bbq smoker. Let’s face it, you can cook barbecue on anything, bullet style smoker, offset fire box smoker, ceramic smoker, electric smoker, pellet grill, charcoal grill, and even a gas grill.
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SWEET AND SPICY BONE-IN PORK LOIN ROAST

June 20, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

HomeBBQ.com

This recipe uses the HomeBBQ.com Old Florida Key Lime Jerk Seasoning, and a Cider Vinegar Marinade. Its real good, let us know what you think.

Items Needed:
2 – 3 lb Bone-in Pork loin roast
1 Jar of HomeBBQ.com Old Florida Key Lime Jerk Seasoning

Marinade Ingredients:
2 cups of Cider Vinegar
2 tbsp of brown sugar
1 tsp of salt
1 tsp of black pepper
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)

Directions:

Mix Marinade Ingredients in non-reactive bowl. Place pork roast and Marinade in a sealed container or plastic bag, and let marinate for a minimum of 1 hour to a maximum of 2 hours.

Remove the pork roast from the marinade, and discard the marinade.

Season pork roast liberally with HomeBBQ.com Old Florida Key Lime Jerk Seasoning.

Let stand for 15 to 20 minutes before cooking.

This roast needs to be cooked indirect at a temperature of 350 degrees for approx. 20-25 minutes per pound. The internal temp of the roast when finished should be 150-155 degrees.

After removing from heat, let stand for 15 minutes before slicing. This will let the juices settle inside the roast.

This recipe can be used for cooking in the oven, smoker or grill.

Enjoy!

GRILLED SWEET ORANGE PORK TENDERLOIN

June 20, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

HomeBBQ.com

This recipe uses HomeBBQ.com Sweet Orange Habenero Seasoning

Ingredients:
2 – Pork Tenderloins
1 – Cup Balsamic Vinegar
1/4 – Cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 – tsp Chopped Garlic
1 – Jar of HomeBBQ.com Sweet Orange Habenero Seasoning

Combine Balsamic Vinegar, Olive Oil, chopped Garlic, and 2 tsp Sweet Orange Habenero Seasoning in a non-reactive bowl.

Place Pork Tenderloins in sealed container, and pour in Vinegar and Oil mixture. Let marinate a minimum of 4 hours, preferrably overnight.

Remove tenderloins from marinade, and season liberally with HomeBBQ.com Sweet Orange Habenero Seasoning. Let stand for 15 minutes. Discard remaining marinade.

Grill Pork Tenderloins over medium-hot fire turning occasionally, for 15 to 25 minutes, until internal temp reaches 155 to 160 degrees.

Remove from heat and let stand for 5 to 10 minutes

Slice, serve, and enjoy!

The Renowned Mr Brown

June 20, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

Leonard Heuberger

In old Southern Slang, Mr Brown is the dark, smoky outside part of the barbequed pork, usually the shoulder. This is the traditional cooking style, perfected by generations of pitmasters to give Mr. Brown his deserved renown.

Southern Succor Rub
1/4 cup ground black pepper
1/4 cup paprika
1/4 cup turbinado sugar
2 tablespoons salt
2 teaspoons dry mustard
1 teaspoon cayenne

6 pound to 8 pound Boston butt

Southern Sop (optional)
Remaining Southern Succor Rub
2 cups cider vinegar
1 cup water
3 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon paprika
1 tablespoon cayenne

Serves 8 to 10

The night before you plan to barbecue, combine the rub ingredients in a small bowl. Massage the pork well with about half of the rub. Transfer the pork to a plastic bag and refrigerate overnight.

Before you begin to barbecue, remove the pork from the refridgerator. Pat down the butt with another coating of rub. Let the pork sit at room temperature for about 45 minutes.

Prepare the smoker for barbecuing, bringing the temperature to 200 degrees F to 220 degrees F.

If you plan to baste the pork, stir any remaining rub together with the mop ingredients in a saucepan and warm the mixture over low heat.

Transfer the pork to the smoker and cook it for about 1 1/2 hours per pound, or internal temperature reaches 170 degrees to 180 degrees.Mop the pork about once an hour in wood-burning pit, or as appropriate for your style smoker.

remove the pork from the smoker and let it sit for about 15 minutes, until cool enough to handle.Pull of chunks of the meat, and either shred or chop them as you wish. Make sure each serving has some of the darker chewier Mr. Brown along with the lighter interior meat. If you wish, serve the pork with Golden Mustard Barbeque Sauce, Carolina Red, or Vaunted Vinegar Sauce.

Tangerine Rotisserie Chicken

June 20, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

HomeBBQ.com
This Recipe uses HomeBBQ.com Old Florida Tangerine Pepper Seasoning.
TANGERINE ROTISSERIE CHICKEN

Ingredients Needed:
1 – 4 to 5 lb. whole chicken
1 – can chicken broth
2 – Tblsp melted Butter
1 Jar of HomeBBQ.com Old Florida Tangerine Pepper Seasoning

Directions:
Combine Chicken Broth, melted butter, and 2 tsp. of the Tangerine Pepper seasoning and mix thouroughly using a wire wisk.
Using an injector, and starting in the breast. Inject the chicken with approximately 8 to 10oz of broth, butter, and seasoning mixture (approx. 2oz per pound).

Season outside of chicken liberally with Tangerine Pepper Seasoning. Place Chicken on Rotisserie, and let cook 20 to 22 minutes per pound. Internal temp of thigh area should be 180 degrees.

When finished let chicken stand for 10 minutes before carving

Enjoy!

HomeBBQ.com Beer Butt Chicken

June 20, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

HomeBBQ.com
This recipe uses HomeBBQ.com Black Jack Rub & Grill

Ingredients needed:
1 – 4 to 5 lb whole chicken
1 – Beer Can (Tall can preferably)
1/2 – Cup Butter
1- tblsp Garlic Salt
1 – Jar of HomeBBQ.com Black Jack Rub & Grill

Directions

Preheat grill or smoker to approximately 250 to 275 degrees.
In a small sauce pan, melt 1/2 cup butter. Mix in 1 tblsp garlic salt, 2 tblsp of Black Jack Rub & Grill. Discard (or drink) 1/2 the beer, leaving the remainder in the can. Add butter, garlic salt, and Black Jack rub to beer can (reserve 1/8th cup).

Place can on a disposable baking sheet.

Set chicken on can, inserting can into the cavity of the chicken.

Brush chicken with Butter, garlic salt, and Black Jack Rub mixture.

Then season liberally with Black Jack Rub & Grill.

Place baking sheet with beer and chicken on the grill. Cook for about 2 to 3 hours, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear. Internal temp of breast 160 to 165 degrees.

Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes

Carve, serve, and enjoy!

Basic Beer Can Chicken

June 20, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Steven Raichlen

Basic Beer-Can Chicken from the Barbecue Boot Camp Recipes…

INGREDIENTS
1 can (12 ounces) beer
1 chicken (3 1/2 to 4 pounds)
2 tablespoons All-Purpose Barbecue Rub or
your favorite commercial rub 2 teaspoons vegetable oil

YOU’LL ALSO NEED
2 cups wood chips or chunks (preferably hickory or cherry), soaked for 1 hour in water and/or beer to cover, then drained Vertical chicken roaster (optional)

DIRECTIONS
1. Pop the tab off the beer can. Pour half of the beer (3/4 cup) over the soaking wood chips or chunks, or reserve for another use. If cooking the chicken on the can, using a church key-style can opener, make 2 additional holes in its top. Set the can of beer aside. Remove the packet of giblets from the body cavity of the chicken and set aside for another use. Remove and discard the fat just inside the body and neck cavities. Rinse the chicken, inside and out, under cold running water and then drain and blot dry, inside and out, with paper towels. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of the rub inside the body cavity and 1/2 teaspoon inside the neck cavity of the chicken. Drizzle the oil over the outside of the bird and rub or brush it all over the skin. Sprinkle the outside of the bird with 1 tablespoon of rub and rub it all over the skin. Spoon the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons of rub into the beer through a hole in the top of the can. Don’t worry if the beer foams up: This is normal.

2. -If cooking on a can: Hold the bird upright, with the opening of the body cavity at the bottom, and lower it onto the beer can so the can fits into the cavity. Pull the chicken legs forward to form a sort of tripod, so the bird stands upright. The rear leg of the tripod is the beer can. -If cooking on a roaster: Fill it with the beer mixture and position the chicken on top, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

3. Tuck the tips of the wings behind the chicken’s back. Set up the grill for indirect grilling and preheat to medium. If using a charcoal grill, place a large drip pan in the center. If using a gas grill, place all the wood chips or chunks in the smoker box or in a smoker pouch and preheat on high until you see smoke, then reduce the heat to medium.

4. When ready to cook, if using a charcoal grill, toss all of the wood chips or chunks on the coals. Stand the chicken up in the center of the hot grate, over the drip pan and away from the heat. Cover the grill and cook the chicken until the skin is a dark golden brown and very crisp and the meat is cooked through (about 180°F) on an instant-read meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of a thigh, but not touching the bone), 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours.

5. -If using a charcoal grill, you’ll need to add 12 fresh coals per side after 1 hour. If the chicken skin starts to brown too much, loosely tent the bird with aluminum foil. -If cooking on a can: Using tongs, hold the bird by the can and carefully transfer it in an upright position to a platter. If cooking on a roaster: Use oven mitts or pot holders to remove the bird from the grill while it’s still on the vertical roaster.

6. Present the bird to your guests. Let the chicken rest for 5 minutes, then carefully lift it off its support. Take care not to spill the hot beer or otherwise burn yourself. Halve, quarter, or carve the chicken and serve.

SERVES 2 to 4

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